Monthly Archive: October 2011

Herman Cain accused of sexual harassment 0

Herman Cain accused of sexual harassment

Jonathan Martin, Maggie Haberman, Anna Palmer & Kenneth P. Vogel – POLITICO During Herman Cain’s tenure as the head of the National Restaurant Association in the 1990s, at least two female employees complained to colleagues and senior association officials about inappropriate behavior by Cain, ultimately leaving their jobs at the trade group, multiple sources confirm to POLITICO. The women complained of sexually suggestive behavior by Cain that made them angry and uncomfortable, the sources said, and they signed agreements with the restaurant group that gave them financial payouts to leave the association. The agreements also included language that bars the women from talking...

Editorial: Missouri law says children have right to life — it’s time to make it so 0

Editorial: Missouri law says children have right to life — it’s time to make it so

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch had an excellent editorial recently. Echoing Shark-Fu’s previous ProgressWomen post, the editorial board called on abortion-restriction-happy Missouri legislators to pay at least as much attention to protecting infants and young children: “Should it be the public policy of the state of Missouri to do as much to protect the lives of young children as it does for unborn children?… “The questions are prompted by Post-Dispatch reporter Nancy Cambria’s emotional roller-coaster of a three-part series last week examining the tragic deaths of infants while under the supervision of child-care providers. “Missouri lawmakers… over the over the past few years,...

Miss Representation  – “Why Does the Media Hate Women?” 0

Miss Representation – “Why Does the Media Hate Women?”

In Miss Representation, a new documentary airing tonight on OWN, Jennifer Seibel Newsom probes the distorted way the media portrays women—and how it affects girls.The director (who happens to be married to CA Lt. Gov Gavin Newsom)  tells Daily Beast such depictions damage self-image. Don’t worry if you miss it tonight because of  the STL Cardinals in the World Series – the St. Louis International Film Festival will be featuring it on November 12 (details to be announced soon). It starts young. “I remember in fifth grade, I was worried about my weight,” says Urenna, a California public-school student. “I straighten...

Topeka decriminalizes domestic violence 6

Topeka decriminalizes domestic violence

Sadly, this is not a headline stolen from The Onion. The City of Topeka, Kansas has repealed the law making domestic violence a crime. Why? The short answer: money and politics. This was the result of a repulsive game of chicken with victims’ lives at stake. Also note that this occurred during national domestic violence awareness month, no less. For shame. Here’s how the New York Times explains it: The startling vote came up at a City Council meeting here on Tuesday, provoked by a run-of-the-mill budget dispute over services that had spun out of control: decriminalize domestic violence. Three arms of government,...

“The Well-Spoken Woman” – Secrets of Powerful Women 0

“The Well-Spoken Woman” – Secrets of Powerful Women

by State Rep. Stacey Newman I met Christine Jahnke, the author of The Well-Spoken Woman at the WiLL/WAND “Women at the Table of Power” conference in D.C. several week ago and HIGHLY RECOMMEND her new book. Written just for women who take leadership seriously, Christine’s new manual is what every woman speaker should memorize.  Dedicated to “Madam President” (whoever she shall be), Christine has worked as an advisor to Hilllary Clinton’s presidential campaign and most recently taught Michelle Obama how to use a teleprompter for her Olympics presentation. I was so impressed with her tips at the conference that I was first...

Senegal Curbs a Bloody Rite for Girls and Women 1

Senegal Curbs a Bloody Rite for Girls and Women

Celia W. Dugger – New York Times SARE HAROUNA, Senegal — When Aissatou Kande was a little girl, her family followed a tradition considered essential to her suitability to marry. Her clitoris was sliced off with nothing to dull the pain. But on her wedding day, Ms. Kande, her head modestly covered in a plain white shawl, vowed to protect her own daughters from the same ancient custom. Days later, her village declared it would abandon female genital cutting for good. Across the continent, an estimated 92 million girls and women have undergone it. But like more than 5,000 other Senegalese villages, Sare Harouna has joined a...